Inside Track

Louth and William Woods broke records in Sunday's qualifier win over London

Inside Track

Joe Carroll

Reporter:

Joe Carroll

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joebellurgan2014@yahoo.ie

Louth and William Woods broke records in Sunday's qualifier win over London

Louth's William Woods. (Pic: Arthur Kinahan)

In rediscovering the winning touch at Ruislip on Sunday, Louth senior footballers created a few records. The winning tally in the ten-point defeat of London was a hefty one and William Woods wrote himself into the county's record books.

But most important of all, interest in the 2018 championship stays alive and a terrible run of defeats across three grades in recent weeks has been brought to an end. It may not be the start of something big, but it brings to a halt something that was soul-destroying.

Paddy Clarke, that ace statistician and keeper of meticulous records, had to go back to the beginning of the last century to find games when a Louth team put more than 2-26 together in a championship match.

An incredible 6-19 was racked up in the 1901 defeat of Meath, and just to show there was more where that came from, on the following Sunday Louth scored 6-14 against Offaly. Those wins, however, were not a prelude to a place in the final.

In more recent times, 2-22 was chalked up in the 1975 defeat of Wicklow, a performance that was highlighted by big Cooley Kickhams midfielder, Peadar McParland, scoring nine points from play. After that Carlow conceded 3-19 to a Declan Smith-coached side in 1994, and two years ago, the same opposition had 2-24 scored against them. Longford gave away 3-17 in 2002.

And now to William Woods. The Naomh Fionnbarra clubman helped himself to 0-13 at Ruislip, more scores than any Louthman has ever scored in a championship match. His tally beats by three, Damien Reid's haul in 1997, and Darren Clarke's in 2005.

James Clifford totalled 13 points in 1925, but he had just five scores, four goals and a point. The Isles of the Sea clubman went along to Croke Park as a spectator, but Laz Molloy-style was plucked from the crowd when one of the selected forwards failed to show.

That, however, was Clifford's only game with the county. Seemingly, the powers that be didn't like the way he "kept the ball on the ground", even though this tactic reaped such a rich harvest, and be it added, helped Louth minors to a famous 5-1 to 1-8 win over Kerry in the All-Ireland minor final of 1936.