No trouble as ‘excursionists’ arrive in Dundalk

July 27 1912

July 27 1912

Sunday last was quite a busy day in Dundalk, no fewer than 8,000 excursionists arrived here.

Two thousand of them came from Dublin, and the others from half a dozen Northern centres.

A feature of the throng was the respectability and sobriety of the excursionists.

We are getting on.

Some years ago on a big excursion day the police and the publicans would have been kept busy.

We are inclined to give a big share of the credit for the better state of things to the enterprise of those which have opened restaurants so freely in Irish towns.

Twenty years ago there were hardly any of these places, and as excursionists had to have refreshment, and were largely limited to alcoholic drinks, the result was a good deal of over-indulgence, and the effects of even a few drinks on empty stomachs were deplorable.

The moral is that people don’t get drunk deliberately or from choice, and that one of the strongest remedies against intemperance is to provide opportunities for rational refeshment.

Dundalk is now well served in this respect but there is much to be done in many towns we know of.

Though the annual holiday of Dundalk was not announced in any way, everybody kept it as a matter of course.

It seems to be inevitable and irrevocable as Christmas itself. The GNR forgot to announce the excursions, and nobody seems to have thought of reminding them, but the excursion trains were run as in previous years.