Trip Through Time

DUNDALK TRIVIA: Where was the Sally Gardens?

Peter Kavanagh

Peter Kavanagh

Reporter:

Peter Kavanagh

Email:

inglenook1@gmail.com

DUNDALK TRIVIA: Where was the Sally Gardens?

DUNDALK TRIVIA: Where was the Sally Gardens?

Where was the Sally Gardens?
This was an area off the Point Road, near the junction with the Red Barns Road, where the old 'Towers' house owned by the Eakin family, stood before the modern housing estate was built there.
The plantation got its name from a coppice of Sally sapling trees cultivated there, for basket making, a craft once carried on by several businesses in town.
Sally rods were also used in the nineteenth century for chastising errant children and driving domestic animals.

Where was the 'Little Chick' factory?
This was a small clothing factory run in part of the old Distillery buildings on the east-side Distillery Lane until demolished in 2004 to make way for new flats facing the Rampart River.
The old Distillery, built in 1799, had been closed down in 1925 and the stone building was occupied by J.J. Haslett, Ltd., Wholesale Grocers, until the late 1960s.
This building had a distinct appearance, with a balcony facing the Rampart, on which their trade name was displayed.

Where is Kearney's Park?
This is the small cultivated traffic island, with trees, at the junction of Anne Street and St. Dominic's Place with The Crescent.
It was created in the early part of last century in memory of a man who lived in the locality. He was an Urban Councillor who campaigned to allow paupers' remains to be interred at St. Patrick's Cemetery.
Previously destitute persons had been buried in the old Paupers' Graveyard off the Ardee Road at Fair Hill.
The little park was created by the Dundalk Urban District Council on the site of an old water pump that had bench seats until about thirty years ago.

Which prominent figure visited Dundalk in April 1904?
King Edward VII made a State visit to Ireland, with his consort Queen Alexander that year.
The royal yacht berthed at Kingston (now Dun Laoghaire) on April 26. Carriages for the royal train had been furnished at the G.N.R. (I) Works at Ardee Road.
The train stopped at Dundalk Railway Station on its way to Belfast but the royal party did not alight. Leading citizens were invited to the platform to express their loyalty and some local businesses were closed for the event. Most nationalists on the local Council, however, were not inclined to support the reception.