Animal flight fears

The second stage of the Tellus Border project is set to literally take off this week in Monaghan, with a fly flying aircraft ready to survey the region.

The second stage of the Tellus Border project is set to literally take off this week in Monaghan, with a fly flying aircraft ready to survey the region.

The project is a highly significant EU-funded environmental mapping project of Ireland’s six border counties - Donegal, Sligo, Leitrim, Cavan, Monaghan and Louth – is set to begin next week (weather permitting).

Yet the this stage of the project is not without it’s controversy, as the Monaghan Democrat revealed earlier in the year. There are genuine fears that the aircraft could scare livestock.

Speaking earlier in the year to the paper, a spokesperson for the project said that they would do everything in their power to avoid ‘spooking cattle’.

Ray Scanlon, Senior Geologist at the Geological Survey of Ireland, said “We are working in full co-operation with the Irish Aviation Authority and the flight plans are strictly regulated – however as the sound of the plane overhead is similar to that of a passing lorry, it may disturb sensitive livestock such as horses, poultry, pedigree cattle and deer if they are outdoors.

“It is therefore important that any animal owner or concerned party contact us as soon as possible so we can discuss any issues and together take action if necessary. ”

The Airborne Survey, conducted by a small aircraft equipped with the very latest geophysical technology, will be flown over the next four to six months and will play a crucial role in the collection and analysis of scientific data on soils, water and rocks across the region.

The aircraft operated and flown by world leaders in this field, Sanders Geophysics Limited from Canada, will be based at St. Angelo Airport, Enniskillen.

Over rural areas the aircraft will fly at an altitude of 60m (approx eight times the height of a two-storey house) and this will increase to 240m as it flies over towns and more densely populated areas.