DCSIMG

Garvey family ‘delighted’ care plan to be drafted

editorial image

editorial image

The family of David Garvey, a Dundalk man who has locked-in syndrome, are “delighted” that a care plan is being drafted which will eventually enable David to be cared for at home.

The Garvey family met with Peter Fitzpatrick TD, Path Healy, National Director of Social Care in the HSE, and Dermot Monaghan, HSE Area Manager in the Dail last week.

The meeting, organised by Deputy Fitzpatrick, facilitated the family to raise their issues with the HSE with a view to finding a solution.

“The family want David home as soon as possible,” Fitzpatrick told The Dundalk Democrat, “In four weeks, a care plan is to be agreed, although there are a lot of challenges ahead.”

The family have been assured that the funding is available, although a care plan will ensure David’s health is prioritised.

It is expected that David, who has been in Beaumont Hospital for over two years, will be transferred to Drogheda.

David will then be cared for at a stepdown facility in the Louth County Hospital, Dundalk.

“The goal is to get David home with his family,” said Deputy Fitzpatrick.

“The main issues at present are clinical and ventilation problems. Pat Healy has promised to do his best to overcome these obstacles.

“We have agreed to meet again in four weeks time to start the plan.”

David’s sister, Lynn, told the paper that the family are delighted with the outcome of the meeting.

She said: “It was a very positive meeting with Peter and the HSE.

“As a family we are delighted with the news.

“There is light at the end of the tunnel. We told David the news and he is over the moon. It is great news for the whole family.

“The end goal is that David will be at home and not die in a hospital.”

David, from St Nicolas Avenue, is incapable of any movement and has been in Beaumont Hospital for over two years.

Ten years ago, David was on a holiday in Paris when he collapsed suddenly.

David suffered three strokes and a brain hemorrhage on that day.

The collapse was caused by abnormal blood cells on David’s brain stem, a condition called cabernoma.

 
 
 

Back to the top of the page