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Cooley colleens needed for unique event

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The forthcoming charity scything event in aid of Our Lady’s Hospital in Crumlin certainly has sparked a lot of interest locally and now the organisers are seeking women to take up the scythe for this unique fundraiser.

The proprietors of Taaffe’s Castle Carlingford are holding the event on Saturday, 30 August.

They have challenged the men (and women) of Louth to harvest a local field without any mechanical assistance.

The event will see teams of men in period dress harvest the field with scythes.

Sé Weston from Castlebellingham, who is participating in the event says the event was organised when a group of local people were looking for an opportunity to host a scything event to raise money for charity.

“We needed a field in a prominent position to promote the event and to ensure we raise the maximum amount we can,” said Sé.

“In response to a request Taaffe’s Castle proprietor Alan Johnson stepped into the fray and offered a field in Carlingford for the event.

“I have, for a long time, been fascinated with scythes as at one time they were the only and most efficient way to harvest grain crops or hay.

“Picture droves of men moving from farm to farm at harvest time working from dawn to dusk mowing the fields,” Sé explains,

“It was a hard life.

Now mechanisation has reduced the numbers of people needed during the harvest and many have never experienced the ways of the past.

Sé however believes that a revival of the scythe is going on at present.

“Promoting the scythe as an eco friendly way of mowing grass in smaller spaces such as orchards to eliminate the noise or air pollution of strimmers or other mechanical cutters,” said Sé.

“There is a Scythe Association covering Ireland and England and they run championships annually.

Organisers of the event are currently seeking men and women to particpate in this unique and fun event.

If you would like to take part or donate to the event please contact Noeleen Rafferty at 087-0924162.

 
 
 

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