Maeve may run in next general election

New Local Election  canditate Maeve Yore from Blakley Close getting on with her election campaign
Independent county councillor Maeve Yore who stormed home in the Dundalk-South area in the May local elections, is prepared to join any newly formed independent alliance that would challenge the big parties in the next general election.

Independent county councillor Maeve Yore who stormed home in the Dundalk-South area in the May local elections, is prepared to join any newly formed independent alliance that would challenge the big parties in the next general election.

Cllr Yore stood in the local election because she was fed up with the major political parties and their inability, as she saw it, to get anything done about the real issues affecting people.

This resulted in her taking the third seat - after Tomas Sharkey, Sinn Fein, and Declan Breathnach, Fianna Fail, with 1,805 first preferences. The quota was 1,364.

It was a vote that shocked the main parties, not least Sinn Fein.

Earlier this month, before the beginning of the new Dail term, Cllr Yore received a letter from Dublin South TD Shane Ross.

It is understood that Deputy Ross wrote to independent councillors throughout the country proposing the formation of an alliance or a new political party to “end the iron grip of the main political parties”.

Deputy Ross proposed a “meeting of like-minded independents”, with a view to challenging the big parties as the 2016 general election] approaches.

Cllr Yore said she would not rule out running in the general election as she still felt totally disaffected by the main political parties.

“The way the Government has handled the property tax,” said Cllr Yore, “is just one example of how badly things are run.

“Councillors are being asked to make a key decision on the tax yet we have no information on future funding.

“The Government in my opinion has been very smart in introducing the 15 per cent cut that councillors can make. In the main it has led to nothing more than politicians seeking political populism.

“Twenty per cent of what is collected here in Louth goes back to central government which is fine for bigger, wealthier countries but not for Louth.

“If we as public representatives vote for the maximum reduction of 15 per cent we will have €1.5 million euro less to spend on community groups, initiatives and services. How fair is that?”

In 2007 Cllr Yore sat in the county council chamber and addressed councillors on the need to provide therapy for children with special needs.

Help was promised but it never came.

So she stood for election and got a huge support last May.