Concern over plans to build a
food waste processor at quays

Lockington,s Yard
The proposed building of a new food waste processor in a protected structure at Lockington’s Yard has caused concern among local residents.

The proposed building of a new food waste processor in a protected structure at Lockington’s Yard has caused concern among local residents.

Planning permission is being sought by Edwin deRoever to build the facility with permission for change of use of part of existing storage building to waste recovery facility.

According to the planning application, which was received by the council on August 8th , the proposed development is within the curtilage of a Protected Structure, Ref. D260 in Dundalk Environs Development Plan- House at “B&I” Gate.

However, some residents have voiced their concern about the new waste recovery facility, and believe that it could potentially lead to unpleasant smells in the area, increased traffic, vermin and wastewater issues.

However, the application has received only one submission, from Quayside Park Management Co, who questioned the amount of traffic that would be involved

The initial phase of the application had gone relatively unnoticed by residents until this week when picture of the planning sign was posted to Facebook.

A decision is set to be made on October 2nd.

Speaking to the Dundalk Democrat, a spokesperson for the Mountview residents said that many of the residents were still unaware of the development.

“Many people still haven’t heard of the development,”the resident said, adding that many people missed the planning notice.

“My house is only about 80 metres from where the facility is going to be. Our fear is that it’s going to create a smell and attract flies and vermin.

“I’ve been on the street since it was built and the vast majority of houses are owner occupied, so people are fearful that this is going to hit any potential property prices as well.”

The application details how the facility will not be a source of odour.

According to the applicant, Edwin deRoever, waste water goes ““automatically” back into the system and is reused and does not come in contact with the outside.

All product is collected and removed at the end of each working day, and “non-organic waste” will be washed and baled and not stored outside the building.

In the letter from Mr deRoever, it also states that: “The depacking line is a totally enclosed system. All materials delivered will be processed directly and there will be no odours in the area.”

He also stated that delivery will be done each morning and would take just two to three trucks, with collection of the organic pulp from a sealed container at the end of the day.

Mr deRoever told the Democrat that the information is with the council and did not wish to make any further comments.