Louth one of the hardest hit by crisis says report

UNEMPLOYMENT and the need for social housing has increased significantly in areas of Louth since the recession a new report suggests.

UNEMPLOYMENT and the need for social housing has increased significantly in areas of Louth since the recession a new report suggests.

The report from the National Economic and Social Council (NESC) entilted: ‘The Social Dimensions of the Crisis: The Evidence and its Implications’ suggest that counties such as Louth have been harder hit than more affluent areas.

The index shows that the areas most affected are the outer reaches of the Dublin ‘commuter belt’, particularly parts of counties Louth, Longford, Offaly, Kildare and Roscommon. Unemployment has substantially increased in these areas, as has the demand for local authority housing.

According to the report the greatest social impact of the economic crisis in Ireland has been the large and sustained increase in unemployment, and in particular, an increase in the number of households where no-one has a job. This is the conclusion of a National Economic and Social Council (NESC) report published today on The Social Dimensions of the Crisis: The Evidence and its Implications. 
Gathering together a wide range of evidence, NESC show that most people have been impacted, at least to some extent, by the crisis. Overall, the majority of households in Ireland have experienced a drop in wealth and/or income since the economic crash in 2008. 
Helen Johnston, one of the authors of the report, points out, however, that some groups in particular have been seriously impacted: ‘those who have lost jobs, had business failures, seen large falls in income or wealth, or who carry a large debt burden have experienced significant social impacts.’ She further outlines that ‘those who were least well-off prior to the economic crisis, especially people who are unemployed, lone parents and people who are ill or disabled, continue to be most at risk of poverty.’

Some of the key findings of the report are that unemployment has increased from 5 per cent in 2007 to 14 per cent in 2012; and young people have especially high unemployment rates – 33 per cent for 15-19 year olds.