Knew BMW car parts were stolen

Dundalk Circuit Court heard last week how stolen BMW car parts were recoverd after gardai stopped and searched a van they had pursued through parts of north Louth after it failed to stop for members of the Traffic Corps.

Dundalk Circuit Court heard last week how stolen BMW car parts were recoverd after gardai stopped and searched a van they had pursued through parts of north Louth after it failed to stop for members of the Traffic Corps.

Mark McCourt (21) formerly with addresses at Inniskeen and Fr. Murray Park, Dundalk was before the court accused of possessing stolen property, dangerous driving and driving without insurance or a driving licence, on the 11th of August last year.

The court was told the defendant was a suspect in relation to a number of burglaries, where vehicles were stolen after the keys were taken although it was not being suggested he was directly involved in the break-ins.

Around 2pm on the date in question, he was spotted driving a British registered van in Rampark and while members of the traffic corps signalled him to stop with flashing lights and sirens, he drove at speed through various townlands in Jenkinstown and Ravensdale before being stopped at Carrickarnon, where stolen car parts for a BMW X5 were found in the van.

The court heard at one point he drove at a garda who deployed a stinger device, but the garda jumped out of the way into a gateway.

During questioning the accused told gardai that he had paid over €2,000 for two BMW cars found at a yard at his home in the Inniskeen area but he “admitted knowing they were stolen”.

The investigating garda agreed with the Defence that the accused was not the ringleader and was afraid to name those involved in the operation.

The court also heard Mark McCourt - who admitted being ‘car mad’ had received €155,000 from two accident compensation claims but had blown most of it on high powered cars which were seized by gardai as he was banned from driving.

Judge Michael O’Shea said the accused had played an important link in the operation and had driven while disqualified.

He imposed sentences totaling two years, with the final year suspended and back dated them to February when the accused went into custody. He also banned him from driving for four years.