Louth Women’s Network is promoting a cohesive voice for rural women in the county

Louth Women’s Network provides an invaluable service to Louth women. The local organisation provides a forum where Louth women in business, the professions and the arts can exchange business ideas and increase their business contacts.

Louth Women’s Network provides an invaluable service to Louth women. The local organisation provides a forum where Louth women in business, the professions and the arts can exchange business ideas and increase their business contacts.

Members are offered support, friendship and the opportunity to attend regular seminars and workshops on business topics, a forum for networking, learning and exchanging contacts and regular communications on issues and opportunities that may be of interest to them.

At the end of August the local organisation was hard at work promoting a unified voice of rural women.

A one day event was held in Lisnawilly House, currently owned by Sally Cox, on the Carrick Road.

On this day three historical legends, St Bridget, King William and Cu Chulainn and their shared linkages with Lisnawilly House were explored.

The ladies of East Down Rural Community Network travelled from the Ards Peninsula to participate in the day.

This event was funded by the Rural Enabler Programme, which is a Peace III funded programme, managed by Rural Community Network, aimed at addressing issues of sectarianism, racism, social exclusion and all other forms of rural inequality.

Throughtout the day different speakers spoke on the three historical legends.

Daragh Smyth who spoke on Cu Chulainn summed up the day.

“Today was a memorial day, the sun was out and a triad of King William, St Bridget and Cu Chulainn filled the room.

All members participated and attitudes, prejudices and established beliefs were challenged.”

Rev John Watson speaking on King William wanting to highlight that the main point of his talk was,

“To let people know the other side, a balanced account of the histories.

I really enjoyed being present and hearing what the other speakers on Cu Chulainn and St. Bridget”.

“Today was a day that we shared what we have in common and we look forward to expanding our areas of interest to build a better community for ourselves and our neighbours,” said Bernadette Nulty from Teagasc. “Today was a journey where we learnt about the people behind these Historical legends and not just about the facts” said Sharon O’Toole, the Rural Enabler for Co. Louth.

“We were inspired, challenged, and above all we learned from each other.

The goodwill of friendship was clearly evident, as was the realisation for the potential for sharing in the now and in the future”.

Fintan Mc Cabe, the Assistant Co-ordinator of the Rural Enabler Programme remarked,

“As a people-centred programme, with its aim of continuing Cross-Border Peace Building, I was very proud to be a part of this event, with lectures, music and walks, which took place on lands of historical significance at “Lisnawilly”.

The attention to detail in the way this project was organised was testimony to the commitment the Networks have, North and South, in building lasting relationships.

I particularly compliment the Louth Women’s Network on their creative approach, and was delighted that the Rural Enabler Programme was able to support the group in doing it their way.”

If you would like to be part of the Louth Womens Network there are two ways to join.

You can either join online at www.networklouth.com or download an application form and post it.