Dundalk is “pleasant”

THE latest Ireland edition published by the Lonely Planet travel guide describes Dundalk’s rival Drogheda as “Louth’s most appealing town”.

THE latest Ireland edition published by the Lonely Planet travel guide describes Dundalk’s rival Drogheda as “Louth’s most appealing town”.

The authors give a brief history of the town and explain that in the Middle Ages, Dundalk was at the northern limits of the English-controlled Pale.

They add that with “partition in 1921 it once again became a border town, this time providing a quick escape from the ‘bandit’ country of South Armagh”.

“An industrial hub, Dundalk is all business and always has been. Although there’s not a lot for visitors here, it’s a pleasant enough place with a couple of interesting sites,” the guide notes.

It names County Museum Dundalk, the “richly decorated” St Patrick’s Cathedral, and “fine neo-Gothic” Courthouse as sights worth visiting.

McAteers The Food House on Clanbrassil Street is given a mention in the Eating section, while prospective tourists are advised that Drogheda to Dundalk via the coast road, and the Flagstaff Viewpoint are worth a trip.

The authors write that the Cooley Peninsula has an “arrested beauty with forested slopes and sun-dappled, multi-hued hills rising out of the dark waters of Carlingford Lough”.

They also note that “as one of the loveliest spots on the coast; Carlingford can be crowded during summer, especially at weekends; book accommodation well ahead”. The 40km Tain Trail which starts in Carlingford and makes a circuit of the Cooley Peninsula, is also mentioned.