Incredible Years website launch

THE Dundalk Incredible Years project, which aims to eliminate behavioural difficulties in children, has hosted the largest ever Incredible Years Ireland Regional Forum.

THE Dundalk Incredible Years project, which aims to eliminate behavioural difficulties in children, has hosted the largest ever Incredible Years Ireland Regional Forum.

The event was held in conjunction with Archways, a national organisation established in 2006 to roll out the Incredible Years Programme, at The Fairways Hotel on Thursday, October 6.

It was the fourth in a series of such events held by Archways. Over 100 people from across the North East region and the North attended the forum, which saw the launch of a new website - www.dundalkincredibleyears.ie.

The Dundalk Educational Disadvantage Chairperson of the Dundalk Incredible Years’ project, Benny McArdle said: “We have been rolling out the Incredible Years’ programme here in Dundalk for two years now and it is great that the progress we have made has been recognised by Archways.

“We are also delighted to formally launch our new website, which gives a very comprehensive overview of the Dundalk Incredible Years project.

“It is important to say that the success of the project would be impossible without the children, their parents and teachers and indeed the schools involved.”

Peadar McKenna, Development Manager at Archways said: “The main purpose of the Incredible Years Ireland Forum is to promote an Incredible Years’ learning community across Ireland, fostering collaboration and ensuring the continued improvement of services to positively change the lives of Irish children.

“Archways is delighted to support the Dundalk Incredible Years project in bringing together over 100 practitioners who share this wonderful aim of changing children’s lives for the better.”

The Incredible Years series contains three separate programmes for parents, teachers and children. It is designed to prevent and treat behavioural difficulties in children aged between three and ten.

The programme was developed in the University of Washington in Seattle by Dr Carolyn Webster-Stratton. Each programme has been designed as standalone intervention but together they aim to provide a cohesive strategy to tackle behavioural difficulties.

The Dundalk project is funded by St Vincent de Paul, Peace III, RAPID, Louth LEADER Partnership, and the local department of Social Protection Office.