Dublin man who was given suspended sentences for two break-ins in Louth avoids going to jail after re-offending

A Dublin man who was given suspended sentences for two break-ins in County Louth four years ago, last week avoided going to jail after he re-offended while he was bound to keep the peace and be of good behavior until 2014.

A Dublin man who was given suspended sentences for two break-ins in County Louth four years ago, last week avoided going to jail after he re-offended while he was bound to keep the peace and be of good behavior until 2014.

Dundalk Circuit Court heard the case had been re-entered on the direction of a district court judge in Naas where 33 year old Martin Wall of Brookfield Drive, Tallaght was convicted of two public order offences on the 5th of January last.

The original hearing in January 2010 heard Martin Wall and his co-accused were passengers in a sports car fitted with false number plates, which was under garda surveillance, when they carried out two separate burglaries at Ballybarrack, Dundalk and Cookstown, Ardee on June 12th 2008 in which a total of €12,000 was stolen.

In the first, the owners returned from voting in a referendum, to find their home had been ransacked and a safe broken into, while the victims of the second burglary came home to find thousands of euro in cash hidden in a shoe and sock drawer had been stolen.

At the sentencing, the court was told Martin Wall had compensation in court for the victims – including his bail money.

Last Friday, the Defence solicitor told the court this was his client’s only fall from grace since he was given the suspended sentence and he stressed that the accused has not come to garda attention for anything of the nature of his previous convictions.

Judge Michael O’Shea said while the public order offences were a breach of the good behavior bond, he must have regard to the totality of the situation - and whether the slippage would warrant activating part or all of the suspended sentence. He said he believed in all the circumstances, the preferred option was to make no order.