Dundalk is dirtier than Drogheda - IBAL survey puts town in 21st position

DUNDALK is officially a dirtier town than its rival Drogheda, according to the latest Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) survey.

DUNDALK is officially a dirtier town than its rival Drogheda, according to the latest Irish Business Against Litter (IBAL) survey.

Out of 53 towns ranked in the survey, Dundalk has been allocated the 21st spot. The ranking is significantly worse than Drogheda which has taken fifth place.

Dundalk shares the 21st ranking with Bray, Co Wicklow; Ennis, Co Clare; and Sligo town.

IBAL has ruled that Dundalk is "Clean to European norms", however, the town has a long climb ahead of it to reach the top five.

Neighbouring Co Cavan fared much better in the survey taking eighth place, however, Dundalk surpassed Monaghan (35th place) and Navan (45th place).

Carlow was announced as the cleanest town in Ireland at a ceremony in Dublin on Monday, January 10 pipping Trim in the 2010 survey of litter levels.

Both were among 39 towns to be classed as "litter-free" .

This is the third time that Carlow has won the IBAL Litter League, the last being in 2005. To mark its success, Carlow will receive a number of trees for planting locally.

The winning town was presented with a special plaque by Dr Tom Cavanagh, Chairman of IBAL, who criticised the Government for failing to tackle the issue of litter in cities, which shows little sign of reducing.

Of the 53 towns surveyed by IBAL, 39, or 74%, were judged litter-free, a record percentage since the League began in 2002, when only two towns were litter-free.

No town was classed as a litter blackspot, with Portlaoise the only town to receive a 'seriously littered' grading.

Our two biggest cities fared poorly, with Cork falling to second from bottom, and Dublin in a lowly 50th position.

Speaking to local authority representatives at the ceremony, Dr Tom Cavanagh said that IBAL had proposed a number of measures to Government to tackle litter in the main urban centres, but that these had "fallen on deaf ears".

Set up in 1996, IBAL is an alliance of companies sharing a belief that continued economic prosperity is contingent on a clean, litter-free environment.