Minister believes Government has
learned from McNulty controversy

Jan O Sullivan Minister for Education at the launch of the DKIT DCU  Graduate school programme with Cliffoird Kelly  Board member DKIT  Professoir Brian McCraith  President of DCU Andrew Griffith   Chairperson  DKIT Governing Body  Denis Cummins  President of DKIT
Minister for Education Jan O’Sullivan believes that the Government has learned a real lesson from the McNulty controversy and that “it will not stop us from pursuing our key policy of job creation.

Minister for Education Jan O’Sullivan believes that the Government has learned a real lesson from the McNulty controversy and that “it will not stop us from pursuing our key policy of job creation.

Asked if something could be done to prevent the mass emigration of graduates and if her party’s coalition partners in Fine Gael were firmly behind the Taoiseach after the McNulty controversy, the Minister told The Democrat that keeping our graduates at home and contributing their skills to an economy that was improving, was the Government’s main focus.

Referring to the appointment of John McNulty to the IMMA board she said:

“Look, I think people have learned from this, and we now have a more transparent selection process in place.”

The minister was at Dundalk Institute of Technology to launch the DCU DkIT Graduate School.

This is the first step in an academic alliance between the two colleges. It means that post graduate students at Dundalk Institute of Technology will have degrees accredited by DCU.

Minister O’Sullivan said Irish doctoral education standards have a strong international recognised and the setting up of the new graduate school will aid the development of research.

The development of regional clusters of third-level education will draw together talent and rescources and provide better programmes and pooling of resources.

Mr Andrew Griffith chairman DkIT governing body said this alliance best serves the people of the region.

“There has been a continual growth in the Institute’s research expenditure over the past decade,” Mr Denis Cummins president DkIT said at the launch.

“Research funding in excess of €40m has been secured from both national and international sources. The Institute is focussed on research that has the potential for real societal and economic impact and that addresses current global challenges.

The DCU-DkIT Graduate School will support this ambitious research agenda and ensure greater progression opportunities for all learners. Students who wish to pursue a Masters’ Degree or a PhD by research can do so in DkIT and receive a DCU accredited award.”

Professor Brian MacCraith, President of DCU says DCU is committed to a research agenda which delivers tangible societal and economic benefit. The establishment of the

DCU-DkIT Graduate School will ensure that research undertaken at both institutions will continue to deliver on this promise.

“We share a common approach to structured PhDs,” he said, “which not only instills in research students a deep understanding of their discipline but also helps them to translate their research outputs in the world of work. Through this most recent undertaking, DkIT students can now benefit from the breadth of expertise and research activities undertaken by DCU, paving the way for future collaborations.”