It would have been better to have backed the jockey Ryan Moore

Joe Carroll

Reporter:

Joe Carroll

The next time I back Ryan Moore he’ll be riding a horse. A golfer and jockey share this name first and second name, and in this column last week I put up the club-swinger as one who had an outsider’s chance of winning the US Open. He was on 125/1 and I had a few quid on, in the hope of winning money of course, but if he won, being able to say I backed a winner at such magnificent odds. Dream on.

The next time I back Ryan Moore he’ll be riding a horse. A golfer and jockey share this name first and second name, and in this column last week I put up the club-swinger as one who had an outsider’s chance of winning the US Open. He was on 125/1 and I had a few quid on, in the hope of winning money of course, but if he won, being able to say I backed a winner at such magnificent odds. Dream on.

Moore didn’t take long to find the troubled spots on a most challenging Merion course, having the plus sign before his score from a very early stage. He was on his way home after the first two rounds, followed by Graeme McDowell, the 28/1 chance who was put up here as the nap.

Maybe we’ll get our money back on the other R Moore this week. He rides at Royal Ascot and is sure to have several fancied mounts.

Darren Clarke was another who didn’t make it on to the leader board for the last two days, but Rory McIlroy did, along with Padraig Harrington and an Irish amateur, Kevin Phelan, who, I must admit, was until this unknown to me.

I’m taking a chance, sort of, in saying none of the still-standing trio was involved at the business end. You see, as we contributors now have to be not only brief, but that bit earlier than usual with our copy, this is being written early on Sunday evening, before the leaders tee-off for their final round.

I thought Harrington was a lost cause, but he came out the week before the Open to put in a solid round in the St Jude Classic. It would be wrong to say his swagger and smile were back at Merion; the truth is they were never away. Even in adversity, the big man takes on the appearance of someone at peace with himself, and not if he never wins another competition, he has the memory of three Major wins to keep him happy.